NRM Seminar Series 2017

You are cordially invited to attend an special talk, NRM Seminar Series 2017

Title: Telecouplings in the East-West Economic Corridor
Speaker: Dr. Stephen J. Leisz, Associate Professor of Geography, Colorado State University, USA.

Date: 3rd March 2017
Time: 14:00-15:00
Room: S101 SERD Building
Registration at https://goo.gl/YYv0mY

Abstract
The conceptual framework of telecoupling seeks to explicitly link land changes in one place, or in a number of places, to distant, usually non-physically connected urban, and in some cases rural, locations. This conceptual framework is offered as a new way of understanding land changes; rather than viewing land-use and land-cover change through discrete land classifications that have been based on the idea of land-use as seen through rural-urban dichotomies, path dependencies and sequential land transitions, and place-based relationships. Focusing on the land-use and land-cover changes taking place along the East-West Economic Corridor that passes from Dong Ha City in Quang Tri, Vietnam, through Sepon District, Savannakhet, Laos, this presentation makes use of data gathered from fieldwork and remote sensing analysis to examine telecouplings between sending, receiving and spill-over systems on both sides of the Vietnam-Laos border.

About the Speaker
Stephen Leisz’s work is focused in the field of land change science. Through the use of remote sensing data, social science fieldwork, and GIS, he investigates the human-environment interactions that lead to land-use and ultimately land-cover changes over local and regional landscapes. His current research focus is on the way that changing livelihood systems in present day Southeast Asia influence land use and land cover changes at local and regional levels, and by extension how these changes influence ecosystem services (e.g. carbon sequestration, biodiversity) and local economies. In the past he has researched potential climate change impacts on biodiversity and human societies in Melanesia and investigated the relationship between land and natural resource tenure systems and land-use/cover changes in parts of Africa and Madagascar.

Posted on: February 23, 2017, by : admnrm